fluc|tu|ate

fluc|tu|ate
fluc|tu|ate «FLUHK chu ayt», verb, -at|ed, -at|ing.
–v.i.
1. to rise and fall; change continually; vary irregularly; waver: »

Prices fluctuate. The temperature fluctuates from day to day. The needle on the scale fluctuates between 125 and 126 pounds. Figurative. His emotions fluctuated between hopefulness and despair.

SYNONYM(S): oscillate, vacillate.
2. to move in waves.
–v.t.
to cause to fluctuate: »

A breeze began to…fluctuate all the still perfume (Tennyson).

[< Latin flūctuāre (with English -ate1) < flūctus, -ūs wave < fluere to flow]

Useful english dictionary. 2012.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • fluc·tu·ate — …   Useful english dictionary

  • fluc — fluc·tu·ant; fluc·tu·ate; fluc·tu·at·ing·ly; fluc·tu·a·tion; fluc·tu·a·tion·al; …   English syllables

  • fluctuate — fluc·tu·ate …   English syllables

  • fluctuate — fluc•tu•ate [[t]ˈflʌk tʃuˌeɪt[/t]] v. at•ed, at•ing 1) to change continually; vary irregularly; shift back and forth or up and down: Prices fluctuated wildly[/ex] 2) to move in waves; undulate 3) to cause to fluctuate • Etymology: 1625–35; < L …   From formal English to slang

  • fluctuate — fluc|tu|ate [ˈflʌktʃueıt] v [I] [Date: 1600 1700; : Latin; Origin: fluctuare, from fluere; FLUENT] if a price or amount fluctuates, it keeps changing and becoming higher and lower = ↑vary fluctuate between ▪ Prices were volatile, fluctuating… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • fluctuate — fluc|tu|ate [ flʌktʃu,eıt ] verb intransitive to change frequently: The price fluctuates between $1 and $2 per kilo …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • fluctuation — 1. The act of fluctuating. 2. A wavelike motion felt on palpating a cavity with nonrigid walls, especially one containing fluid. SYN: fluctuance. * * * fluc·tu·a·tion .flək chə wā shən n 1) a motion like that of waves esp the wavelike motion of a …   Medical dictionary

  • Fluctuate — Fluc tu*ate, v. t. To cause to move as a wave; to put in motion. [R.] [1913 Webster] And fluctuate all the still perfume. Tennyson. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fluctuate — Fluc tu*ate, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Fluctuated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Fluctuating}.] [L. fluctuatus, p. p. of fluctuare, to wave, fr. fluctus wave, fr. fluere, fluctum, to flow. See {Fluent}, and cf. {Flotilla}.] 1. To move as a wave; to roll hither… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fluctuated — Fluctuate Fluc tu*ate, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Fluctuated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Fluctuating}.] [L. fluctuatus, p. p. of fluctuare, to wave, fr. fluctus wave, fr. fluere, fluctum, to flow. See {Fluent}, and cf. {Flotilla}.] 1. To move as a wave; to roll …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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